Comments on: Pentatonic Scales http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1= Play better with free online guitar lessons. Sat, 26 Aug 2017 08:59:02 +0000 hourly 1 By: Patrick MacFarlane http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1=#comment-3187 Tue, 15 Aug 2017 11:09:38 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=178#comment-3187 Thank you for the question. The black dots are the root notes of the pattern.

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By: Shanuka http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1=#comment-3128 Tue, 01 Aug 2017 04:19:24 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=178#comment-3128 What do the black dots represent?

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By: Ginny Tobey http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1=#comment-2388 Wed, 29 Mar 2017 22:41:46 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=178#comment-2388 I just was trying the same lesson and had the same questions. Thanks for you clear, helpful explanation. Now I’m getting it!

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By: Patrick MacFarlane http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1=#comment-2309 Tue, 21 Mar 2017 01:28:19 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=178#comment-2309 Thank you for your question. The box patterns are moveable patterns and not showing a specific fretboard location, though I can see why you were confused. You must place the root note on the proper note rather than assuming the fret number of the box pattern. The root note can be on an open string. In the case of the E minor pentatonic box, the first fret of the pattern should be the open strings (or the 12th fret if you want to play an octave up). Similarly, the G major box pattern, should be rooted on the open 3rd string or 12th fret of the 3rd string. I hope this helps!

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By: Paul http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1=#comment-2293 Sun, 19 Mar 2017 01:29:03 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=178#comment-2293 Following on from your above explanation of the filled in dots being the root notes; if you look at several of the box samples e.g e form box pattern and g form box pattern

The first note of the e form box pattern (in the diagram) is being played on the first fret on the e string, but this is an f(e#). Also seventh note on the g form box is also being played on the first fret of the g string and is therefore a g#.

Are these box form diagrams therefore correct?

PaulS

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By: Nathaniel Fin http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1=#comment-1130 Tue, 11 Oct 2016 15:56:26 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=178#comment-1130 Thank you.
This is a big help.
Good illustration.

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By: Bill Gerrior http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1=#comment-836 Thu, 01 Sep 2016 03:29:31 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=178#comment-836 enjoyed lessons with multiple approaches

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By: Patrick MacFarlane http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1=#comment-761 Thu, 28 Jul 2016 10:51:10 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=178#comment-761 Blair, Thank you for your comment and question. Filled-in notes are root notes. Not-filled-in notes are the other notes of the scale. In a C major pentatonic scale, the C notes would be filled in. You can move the pattern around too. For example, if you went down in pitch by 1 fret, you would have the B major pentatonic scale. I hope this helps! If you need more information, you can find it in my lesson on chord diagrams, fretboard patterns, and rhythm charts.

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By: Blair Menzies http://smashertraining.com/?success=blues pentatonic scale guitar tab&h1=#comment-759 Thu, 28 Jul 2016 02:47:29 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=178#comment-759 What do the filled-in and not-filled-in notes represent on the box patterns?

Thanks,
Blair

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